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  • Bad breath (halitosis) is caused by bacteria, plaque, tartar, decomposing food particles, or death of tissue. Treatment of halitosis in cats involves eliminating the cause(s). The teeth need to be thoroughly cleaned and polished under general anesthesia. Teeth affected by advanced periodontal disease or tooth resorption need to be extracted. Reducing the accumulation of plaque, tartar, and resulting halitosis can be achieved by using VOHC accepted products.

  • Halitosis is caused by bacteria, plaque, and tartar. Once halitosis occurs, professional veterinary oral prevention, assessment, and treatment is needed. Teeth affected by advanced periodontal disease need to be extracted. Reducing the accumulation of plaque, tartar, and resulting halitosis can be achieved by using VOHC accepted products.

  • Cats have four types of teeth: incisors, canines, premolars, and molars. There are two types of malocclusion: skeletal and dental. Skeletal malocclusion results when an abnormal jaw length creates a malalignment of the teeth. A dental malocclusion occurs when the upper and lower jaw lengths are considered normal but there may be one or more teeth that are out of normal alignment. Skeletal malocclusions include mandibular distoclusion (Class 2 malocclusion), mandibular mesioclusion (Class 3 malocclusion) and maxillomandibular asymmetry. Dental malocclusions include mesioverted canines and mesiopalatoverted maxillary canines.

  • Dogs have four types of teeth: incisors, canines, premolars and molars. There are two types of malocclusion: skeletal and dental. Skeletal malocclusion results when an abnormal jaw length creates a malalignment of the teeth. A dental malocclusion occurs when the upper and lower jaw lengths are considered normal but there may be one or more teeth that are out of normal alignment. Skeletal malocclusions include mandibular distoclusion (Class 2 malocclusion), mandibular mesioclusion (Class 3 malocclusion) and maxillomandibular asymmetry. Dental malocclusions include rostral crossbite, caudal crossbite, linguoverted mandibular canines, and mesioverted maxillary canines.

  • There are many reasons why your cat might need oral surgery. Acute sensitivity to plaque and oral tumors are two conditions that may require surgery. Your veterinarian may refer your cat to a board-certified dentist, surgeon, or oncologist. Prior to your cat’s surgery, blood tests will be performed in order to prepare a anesthetic protocol suitable for you cat. Post-surgery, anti-inflammatory medications may be administered as well as narcotic medications. Most cats recover with minimal discomfort and will need to eat soft food until healing is complete.

  • There are many reasons why your dog might need oral surgery. Oral tumors or repair of jaw fractures are two conditions that may require surgery. Your veterinarian may refer your dog to a board-certified dentist, surgeon, or oncologist. Prior to your dog’s surgery, blood tests will be performed in order to prepare an anesthetic protocol suitable for you dog. Post-surgery, anti-inflammatory medications may be administered, as well as narcotic medications. Most dogs recover with minimal discomfort and will need to eat soft food until healing is complete.

  • There are many causes of oral swellings, including local trauma, infection, fluid accumulation and tumors. If you find an oral swelling in your cat’s mouth, book an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as possible. Some oral swellings can be painful to touch, so to protect yourself from being bitten, do not touch the swelling. Your veterinarian will perform diagnostic tests such as intraoral radiographs, blood tests, and tissue sampling. Treatment and prognosis will depend on the cause.

  • There are many causes of oral swellings, including local trauma, infection, fluid accumulation and tumors. If you find an oral swelling in your dog’s mouth, book an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as possible. Some oral swellings can be painful to touch, so to protect yourself from being bitten, do not touch the swelling. Your veterinarian will perform diagnostic tests such as intraoral radiographs, blood tests, and tissue sampling. Treatment and prognosis will depend on the cause.

  • Oral fibrosarcomas are the second most common malignant oral tumor in cats. These tumors arise from the connective and fibrous tissues of the oral cavity. These tumors may spread to the underlying bone causing pain. Treatment involves surgical removal of the tumors and radiation treatment may be considered if surgery is incomplete.

  • The most common oral tumor seen in cats is squamous cell carcinoma; the second most common is fibrosarcoma. Both of these tumors are locally aggressive, can grow to a large size very quickly, ulcerate, and cause considerable pain. Diagnosis may be performed through fine needle aspiration or biopsy. Metastasis to organs is not common with both tumor types; however, staging is recommended to choose therapy. Surgical excision provides the best control but may not be possible in some cases. Radiation therapy may provide some benefit either for primary control or after surgery.

Location

Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 6:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 6:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 6:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 6:00pm
Friday8:00am – 6:00pm
Saturday9:00am – 12:00pm
SundayClosed

Office hours vary during holidays and certain times of year, please call our office to confirm our hours.